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Anatomy of a wheel-tracked tank L-30 | Warspot.net
Anatomy of a wheel-tracked tank L-30

Landsverk company began operations in the mid-19th century as a railcar manufacturer. In the 1920s, the company went bankrupt and was bought by the German firm Gute-Hoffnungs-Hütte. Since the Versailles Treaty prohibited the Germans from developing armored vehicles, the Swedish firm was used to circumvent the terms of the treaty. Therefore, the Landsverk was eagerly engaged in the manufacturing process of a tank for the Swedish army. Two versions were made — the tracked L-10 and the wheel-tracked L-30. Although the tank was developed at a Swedish company by order of the Swedish military, the chief designer was the German named Otto Merker, and a significant part of the units used in the design were of German origin.

Otto Merker tried to solve one of the main problems of wheel-tracked tanks — the difficulty of changing the propulsion type – when he was still working on the first prototype, L-5. The L-30 used the same system. The transition from tracks to wheels took place quickly and without the crew leaving the tank. Another advanced solution was the use of armor welding — most tanks from other countries had riveted armor. A 37 mm Bofors cannon and two machine guns were used as weapons. The tank had bulletproof armor from 6 to 14 millimeters thick. The crew consisted of three people.

​The L-30 project was the last embodied in metal attempt of Sweden to create a light tank, the chassis of which could combine all the best aspects of tracks and wheels - Anatomy of a wheel-tracked tank L-30 | Warspot.net
The L-30 project was the last embodied in metal attempt of Sweden to create a light tank, the chassis of which could combine all the best aspects of tracks and wheels
​The tank turned out to be noticeably larger and heavier than its German prototype L-5. The combat weight of the L-30 vehicle exceeded 11 650 kg - Anatomy of a wheel-tracked tank L-30 | Warspot.net
The tank turned out to be noticeably larger and heavier than its German prototype L-5. The combat weight of the L-30 vehicle exceeded 11 650 kg
​The armored hull was supposed to be welded from sheets of rolled armour plates, but the first (and only) prototype was assembled from ordinary steel - Anatomy of a wheel-tracked tank L-30 | Warspot.net
The armored hull was supposed to be welded from sheets of rolled armour plates, but the first (and only) prototype was assembled from ordinary steel
​Left side. On tracks the tank moved on the highway at a speed up to 35 km/h, and on wheels it could go up to 75 km/h. The operational range reached 200 kilometers - Anatomy of a wheel-tracked tank L-30 | Warspot.net
Left side. On tracks the tank moved on the highway at a speed up to 35 km/h, and on wheels it could go up to 75 km/h. The operational range reached 200 kilometers
​Right side - Anatomy of a wheel-tracked tank L-30 | Warspot.net
Right side
​Rear deck and left side - Anatomy of a wheel-tracked tank L-30 | Warspot.net
Rear deck and left side
​Mufflers and the rear tow hook - Anatomy of a wheel-tracked tank L-30 | Warspot.net
Mufflers and the rear tow hook
​Lower frontal armor plate - Anatomy of a wheel-tracked tank L-30 | Warspot.net
Lower frontal armor plate
​Front tow hook - Anatomy of a wheel-tracked tank L-30 | Warspot.net
Front tow hook
​The frontal armor plate of the hull was 14 mm thick - Anatomy of a wheel-tracked tank L-30 | Warspot.net
The frontal armor plate of the hull was 14 mm thick
​Top view of the front of the tank - Anatomy of a wheel-tracked tank L-30 | Warspot.net
Top view of the front of the tank
​There was only one driver's seat on the L-30 tank, unlike the L-5, and it was located on the left side - Anatomy of a wheel-tracked tank L-30 | Warspot.net
There was only one driver's seat on the L-30 tank, unlike the L-5, and it was located on the left side
​Headlight of a Swedish tank with a marking of the German company Bosch - Anatomy of a wheel-tracked tank L-30 | Warspot.net
Headlight of a Swedish tank with a marking of the German company Bosch
​View of the driver's seat. The steering wheel is of an automotive type - Anatomy of a wheel-tracked tank L-30 | Warspot.net
View of the driver's seat. The steering wheel is of an automotive type
​View through the driver’s hatch on the interior of the turret - Anatomy of a wheel-tracked tank L-30 | Warspot.net
View through the driver’s hatch on the interior of the turret
​The design of the conical turret made it possible to further change the composition of the tank's armament by installing a suitable weapon or machine gun of a different model on it - Anatomy of a wheel-tracked tank L-30 | Warspot.net
The design of the conical turret made it possible to further change the composition of the tank's armament by installing a suitable weapon or machine gun of a different model on it
​Observation device cone - Anatomy of a wheel-tracked tank L-30 | Warspot.net
Observation device cone
​Side turret hatch with an additional vizor - Anatomy of a wheel-tracked tank L-30 | Warspot.net
Side turret hatch with an additional vizor
​Inside the fighting chamber it was possible to place stowage for 100 shells for the cannon and 3000 rounds for the machine gun - Anatomy of a wheel-tracked tank L-30 | Warspot.net
Inside the fighting chamber it was possible to place stowage for 100 shells for the cannon and 3000 rounds for the machine gun
​Top view of the gun mantlet - Anatomy of a wheel-tracked tank L-30 | Warspot.net
Top view of the gun mantlet
​Main gun and machine gun mantlets - Anatomy of a wheel-tracked tank L-30 | Warspot.net
Main gun and machine gun mantlets
​The prototype received a 37 mm Bofors rifle gun - Anatomy of a wheel-tracked tank L-30 | Warspot.net
The prototype received a 37 mm Bofors rifle gun
​All the armament of the L-30 tank was in the turret - Anatomy of a wheel-tracked tank L-30 | Warspot.net
All the armament of the L-30 tank was in the turret
​A 12-cylinder Maybach petrol engine with a capacity of 150 hp was placed in the rear part of the hull - Anatomy of a wheel-tracked tank L-30 | Warspot.net
A 12-cylinder Maybach petrol engine with a capacity of 150 hp was placed in the rear part of the hull
​Top view of the engine compartment - Anatomy of a wheel-tracked tank L-30 | Warspot.net
Top view of the engine compartment
​The side of the engine compartment - Anatomy of a wheel-tracked tank L-30 | Warspot.net
The side of the engine compartment
​Tool & spares box on the left side - Anatomy of a wheel-tracked tank L-30 | Warspot.net
Tool & spares box on the left side
​Base for a tool & spares box on the right side - Anatomy of a wheel-tracked tank L-30 | Warspot.net
Base for a tool & spares box on the right side
​Air duct of the engine plate - Anatomy of a wheel-tracked tank L-30 | Warspot.net
Air duct of the engine plate
​The tracked chassis included two return rollers - Anatomy of a wheel-tracked tank L-30 | Warspot.net
The tracked chassis included two return rollers
​On each side of the tank there were four road wheels, they were interlocked in two and equipped with leaf springs - Anatomy of a wheel-tracked tank L-30 | Warspot.net
On each side of the tank there were four road wheels, they were interlocked in two and equipped with leaf springs
​The attachment points for the wheeled propulsor were located on the side of the tank, above the road wheels and under the track run - Anatomy of a wheel-tracked tank L-30 | Warspot.net
The attachment points for the wheeled propulsor were located on the side of the tank, above the road wheels and under the track run
​Steering wheel - Anatomy of a wheel-tracked tank L-30 | Warspot.net
Steering wheel
​Rear driving wheel - Anatomy of a wheel-tracked tank L-30 | Warspot.net
Rear driving wheel
​When on wheels, only the rear axle was driven - Anatomy of a wheel-tracked tank L-30 | Warspot.net
When on wheels, only the rear axle was driven
​The mechanism for lowering and lifting the wheels, according to some sources, had an electric drive - Anatomy of a wheel-tracked tank L-30 | Warspot.net
The mechanism for lowering and lifting the wheels, according to some sources, had an electric drive
​The crowbar mount on the side - Anatomy of a wheel-tracked tank L-30 | Warspot.net
The crowbar mount on the side
​Exhaust pipe - Anatomy of a wheel-tracked tank L-30 | Warspot.net
Exhaust pipe
​Middle wheels suspension - Anatomy of a wheel-tracked tank L-30 | Warspot.net
Middle wheels suspension
​Tracks - Anatomy of a wheel-tracked tank L-30 | Warspot.net
Tracks
​Side mounts - Anatomy of a wheel-tracked tank L-30 | Warspot.net
Side mounts
​View of the internal mechanism of the drive wheel - Anatomy of a wheel-tracked tank L-30 | Warspot.net
View of the internal mechanism of the drive wheel
​Museum plaque close up - Anatomy of a wheel-tracked tank L-30 | Warspot.net
Museum plaque close up

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